Wireless Definitions

  • A

    active RFID (active radio frequency identification)

    Active RFID (radio frequency identification) tags are continuously operating, battery-powered sensors that gather and transmit data to a reading device.

  • Apple iBeacon

    Apple’s iBeacon uses Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) to detect a compatible device within a beacon's vicinity.

  • B

    Bluetooth Low Energy (Bluetooth LE)

    Also marketed as Bluetooth Smart, Bluetooth LE was introduced in the Bluetooth 4.0 specification as an alternative to Bluetooth Classic. Like its predecessor, Bluetooth LE uses frequency hopping wireless technology in the 2.4 GHz unlicensed radio band to interconnect nearby devices.

  • D

    drone (unmanned aerial vehicle, UAV)

    A drone, in a technological context, is an unmanned aircraft. More formally known as an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), a drone is, essentially, a flying robot.

  • G

    Google Glass

    Google Glass is a wearable, voice-controlled Android device that resembles a pair of glasses and displays information directly in the user's field of vision.

  • I

    item-level RFID (item-level radio frequency identification)

    Item-level RFID involves individual unit tagging, as opposed to tagging cartons or pallets of items.

  • M

    Memory Spot

    Memory Spot is the trade name for a passive transponder under development by Hewlett-Packard that contains a chip capable of storing large data files such as digital photographs, databases or musical selections... (Continued)

  • N

    Nest Labs

    Nest Labs is a home automation specialist company that produces programmable Wi-Fi-enabled products that can be remotely controlled through a Web service or an associated smart home app.

  • P

    pervasive computing (ubiquitous computing)

    Pervasive computing (ubiquitous computing) is the growing trend of embedding computational capability into everyday objects to enable them to communicate and perform useful tasks.

  • R

    RF-powered computing

    RF-powered computing is the use of radio frequency (RF) signals to enable the operation and communication of low-power devices, typically for machine-to-machine (M2M) networking.

  • RFID (radio frequency identification)

    RFID (radio frequency identification) is a technology that incorporates the use of electromagnetic or electrostatic coupling in the radio frequency (RF) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum to uniquely identify an object, animal, or person....(Continued)

  • RFID skimming

    RFID skimming is the wireless interception of information from RFID chip-based debit, credit and ID cards and other documents, such as passports. The purpose of RFID skimming may be simple theft or more complex identity theft. Most typically, thieves use an NFC-enabled device that records unencrypted data from the card's RFID chip, which is broadcast into the air.

  • RFID tagging

    RFID tagging is an ID system that uses small radio frequency identification devices for identification and tracking purposes.

  • RFID virus

    An RFID (radio-frequency identification) virus is malicious code inserted into an RFID tag to alter or corrupt data in an RFID system.

  • T

    transponder

    A transponder is a wireless communications, monitoring, or control device that picks up and automatically responds to an incoming signal.

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