Definitions

  • A

    active RFID (active radio frequency identification)

    Active RFID (radio frequency identification) tags are continuously operating, battery-powered sensors that gather and transmit data to a reading device.

  • active sensor

    An active sensor is a device with a transmitter that sends out a signal, light wavelength or electrons to be bounced off a target, with data gathered by the sensor upon their reflection. Active sensors contrast with passive sensors, which simply detect and respond to some type of input from the physical environment.

  • actuator

    An actuator is a mechanism that turns energy into a controlled motion.

  • addressability

    Addressability is the capacity for an entity to be targeted and found. To be addressable, an entity must be uniquely identifiable, which means that it must be associated with something -- typically an alphanumeric string, although there are other possibilities -- that is not associated with anything else that exists within that system.

  • advanced metering infrastructure (AMI)

    Advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) is an architecture for automated, two-way communication between a smart utility meter with an IPaddress and a utility company.

  • Amazon Prime Air drone

    Amazon's Prime Air drone is a delivery system in development that uses remote-controlled robotic vehicles to transport goods from the warehouse to the consumer. The drones are small, unmanned octocopters -- helicopters with eight rotors -- that use GPS navigation.

  • Apple iBeacon

    Apple’s iBeacon uses Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) to detect a compatible device within a beacon's vicinity.

  • B

    Blue Gene

    Blue Gene is a supercomputer development project at IBM for a series of high-performance system-on-a-chip (SoC) arcitectures with minimal power demands. The series includes Blue Gene/L, Cyclops64, (formerly Blue Gene/C), Blue Gene/P and Blue Gene/Q.

  • Bluetooth Low Energy (Bluetooth LE)

    Also marketed as Bluetooth Smart, Bluetooth LE was introduced in the Bluetooth 4.0 specification as an alternative to Bluetooth Classic. Like its predecessor, Bluetooth LE uses frequency hopping wireless technology in the 2.4 GHz unlicensed radio band to interconnect nearby devices.

  • bring your own wearables

    Bring your own wearables (BYOW) is a trend toward the use of employee-owned wearable computing devices in a business setting.

  • C

    car hacking

    Car hacking is the manipulation of the code in a car's electronic control unit (ECU) to exploit a vulnerability and gain control of other ECU units in the vehicle.  

  • Chief IoT Officer (Chief Internet of Things Officer)

    A Chief Internet of Things Officer is an enterprise executive in charge of how smart products are developed and implemented to best support company objectives and goals.

  • control network

    A control network is a network of nodes that collectively monitor, sense, and control or enable control of an environment for a particular purpose.

  • D

    device attack

    A device attack is an exploit in which the attacker takes advantage of a vulnerable device to gain network access.

  • drone (unmanned aerial vehicle, UAV)

    A drone, in a technological context, is an unmanned aircraft. More formally known as an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), a drone is, essentially, a flying robot.

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